A Serbian Wedding

A Serbian Wedding

On a small boat on the Danube and Sava rivers, on a warm July evening in front of a small audience of about twenty friends and family, my friends got married. We were docked for the short ceremony, which took place in both Serbian and English (required by law, as my friend suggested, so that foreigners wouldn't get duped into marrying a Serb). 

As kuma (Maid of Honour) I should have helped with a bit of the planning, like booking a band. But I was relinquished of those duties immediately after accepting the position, as it was clear I had no idea how I was supposed to do that from Canada. The groom put together a beautiful ceremony and reception that combined Canadian and Serbian wedding traditions.

A Long Layover in London

A Long Layover in London

I like to think of myself as a well-seasoned traveller who can handle all the chaos and confusion of international travel. But when I arrive at the airport to start a six-week adventure and am greeted with "Oh, did you know that your flight is delayed?", I too get frustrated. No, I did not know that. Despite downloading your app and checking my emails, there was no message from your airline, thank you very much.

Prohibition City: A Walk Through Vancouver's Dry Past

Prohibition City: A Walk Through Vancouver's Dry Past

“Friends, gather ‘round,” he says. He’s got a story to tell us. On this dark and drizzly October evening, Will Woods, of Forbidden Vancouver’s walking tours, was guiding our group through downtown Vancouver and a gloomy era of Vancouver’s past: Prohibition.

We had gathered at the Holy Rosary Cathedral—where “they served more than Holy Communion” during Prohibition, he said—and made our way to Victory Square. Woods, dressed for the part in a long beige trench coat and dark grey fedora, looks like he might have stepped out of the early twentieth century to tell us about how British Columbians actually voted for Prohibition in October of 1916, exactly one hundred years ago.

The Day I Didn't Volunteer with Refugees in Greece

The Day I Didn't Volunteer with Refugees in Greece

It wasn't that obvious, the collection of dark green and blue tarpaulins, almost hidden behind a stone wall along the southern ring road around the Chios castle, but it was the white ones with the UNHCR logo that gave it away. I had never seen a refugee camp before.

One of the reasons I chose to visit Chios in Greece, of all the country's 1200 habitable islands, was because of the refugees here. For the past year I have been following the news stories about refugees from the Middle East that have reached Greece's shores, and with its close proximity to Turkey, Chios has had a large flow of these migrants.