Serbia

Belgrade's Nikola Tesla Museum

Belgrade's Nikola Tesla Museum

According to legend, explorer Christopher Columbus could make an egg stand on its end. (If you're curious and near a fridge, try it now before you read on.) Columbus demonstrated this in defence of his discovery of the New World. Surely if he hadn't found it, he was told, someone else would have. Historian Girolamo Benzoni wrote the tale in 1565:

Columbus was dining with many Spanish nobles when one of them said: 'Sir Christopher, even if your lordship had not discovered the Indies, there would have been, here in Spain, which is a country abundant with great men knowledgeable in cosmography and literature, one who would have started a similar adventure with the same result.' Columbus did not respond to these words but asked for a whole egg to be brought to him. He placed it on the table and said: 'My lords, I will lay a wager with any of you that you are unable to make this egg stand on its end like I will do without any kind of help or aid.'

A Serbian Wedding

A Serbian Wedding

On a small boat on the Danube and Sava rivers, on a warm July evening in front of a small audience of about twenty friends and family, my friends got married. We were docked for the short ceremony, which took place in both Serbian and English (required by law, as my friend suggested, so that foreigners wouldn't get duped into marrying a Serb). 

As kuma (Maid of Honour) I should have helped with a bit of the planning, like booking a band. But I was relinquished of those duties immediately after accepting the position, as it was clear I had no idea how I was supposed to do that from Canada. The groom put together a beautiful ceremony and reception that combined Canadian and Serbian wedding traditions.

Belgrade Does Art Right

Not content with simple black and white stripes, there's a crosswalk in the Dorcol quarter of Belgrade that is a literal zebra crossing, (I crossed this street about a dozen times, much to the confusion of the Belgraders in the area, I'm sure.) To visit, simply head to the Dorcol neighbourhood, located near the Danube River and Kalemegdan Fortress, and wander around...

‘Dark Tourism’ Defined

‘Dark Tourism’ Defined

I participated in a twitter chat recently that introduced me to the idea of "dark tourism." I had never heard this term before, so I was stumped by the first question: What does dark tourism mean to you?

Dark tourism, according to the Institute of Dark Tourism Research, is “travel to sites of death, disaster, or the seemingly macabre,” such as to battlefields, prisons, or cemeteries. It may also be known as morbid tourism, disaster tourism, grief tourism, black spot tourism, or even phoenix tourism, I’m assuming as a metaphor for rising...